Salt Swap: A feasibility randomised controlled trial of a behavioural intervention to reduce salt intake among people with high blood pressure
PHE ePoster Library. Payne Riches S. 09/12/19; 274521; 79
Sarah Payne Riches
Sarah Payne Riches
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Abstract
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Abstract Background
: High salt intake is associated with high blood pressure. Average salt intake in the UK continues to exceed recommendations despite population-level strategies and health guidelines to reduce salt intake. Here we test the feasibility of a novel, smartphone-based intervention to reduce salt intake among people with high blood pressure. Methods: Adults with a clinical record of high blood pressure were recruited from GP practices. Forty-six participants were randomised to receive either a brief behaviour-change intervention delivered in person by a nurse, including use of a smartphone app; or a salt-reduction advice leaflet by post (control). The ‘Salt Swap' app helps identify lower salt products, at the point of purchase when grocery shopping. We conducted 18 accompanied shopping trips and participant interviews to understand participants' grocery shopping behaviours and the influence of the study content on their shopping and salt consumption behaviours. The primary outcomes are criteria for progression to a full trial. Secondary outcomes include changes in salt content of purchased grocery products, 24-hour urinary sodium, and blood pressure, after six weeks. We also conducted a process evaluation.
Results
We will present results of the feasibility trial, including follow-up attendance rates, intervention fidelity and use of the intervention app, as well as process outcomes, and changes in salt intake and blood pressure.
Conclusions
We will conclude whether this intervention holds promise; and whether a future trial to test the effectiveness of the intervention for reducing blood pressure, is feasible and justified. External funding details SPR is funded by a British Heart Foundation fellowship and the Medical Research Council. CP's time on this project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Oxford at Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust (CLAHRC). SJ and PA are NIHR senior investigators and are funded by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) Obesity, Diet and Lifestyle Theme and NIHR CLAHRC MR is funded by the British Heart Foundation (grant number: 006/PSS/CORE/2016/OXFORD) JS is funded by a Wellcome Trust/Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellowship (ref: 211182/Z/18/Z) and also receives funding from the NIHR School for Primary Care Research and the NIHR CLAHRC.
Abstract Background
: High salt intake is associated with high blood pressure. Average salt intake in the UK continues to exceed recommendations despite population-level strategies and health guidelines to reduce salt intake. Here we test the feasibility of a novel, smartphone-based intervention to reduce salt intake among people with high blood pressure. Methods: Adults with a clinical record of high blood pressure were recruited from GP practices. Forty-six participants were randomised to receive either a brief behaviour-change intervention delivered in person by a nurse, including use of a smartphone app; or a salt-reduction advice leaflet by post (control). The ‘Salt Swap' app helps identify lower salt products, at the point of purchase when grocery shopping. We conducted 18 accompanied shopping trips and participant interviews to understand participants' grocery shopping behaviours and the influence of the study content on their shopping and salt consumption behaviours. The primary outcomes are criteria for progression to a full trial. Secondary outcomes include changes in salt content of purchased grocery products, 24-hour urinary sodium, and blood pressure, after six weeks. We also conducted a process evaluation.
Results
We will present results of the feasibility trial, including follow-up attendance rates, intervention fidelity and use of the intervention app, as well as process outcomes, and changes in salt intake and blood pressure.
Conclusions
We will conclude whether this intervention holds promise; and whether a future trial to test the effectiveness of the intervention for reducing blood pressure, is feasible and justified. External funding details SPR is funded by a British Heart Foundation fellowship and the Medical Research Council. CP's time on this project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Oxford at Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust (CLAHRC). SJ and PA are NIHR senior investigators and are funded by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) Obesity, Diet and Lifestyle Theme and NIHR CLAHRC MR is funded by the British Heart Foundation (grant number: 006/PSS/CORE/2016/OXFORD) JS is funded by a Wellcome Trust/Royal Society Sir Henry Dale Fellowship (ref: 211182/Z/18/Z) and also receives funding from the NIHR School for Primary Care Research and the NIHR CLAHRC.
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