Testing an individual level instrument of self-reported socio-economic deprivation in Hackney
PHE ePoster Library. Miller S. 09/12/19; 274459; 253
Mr. Sandy Miller
Mr. Sandy Miller
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Abstract
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Abstract In urban populations, and particularly in London, people from extremes of wealth and poverty can live in close proximity. A simple individual test of self-reported socio-economic deprivation ('Do you ever have difficulty making ends meet at the end of the month?'), which was developed and validated in a Canadian primary care setting1, was tested in a survey of 1,000 adults resident in Hackney, selected to be broadly representative of the population. We use this dataset to examine health inequalities using this individual level measure, and compare results with the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2015 (IMD, which applies to populations in areas of around 1,500 residents, and is a composite of 37 different statistics reflecting different aspects of deprivation in an area). We show that the simpler measure is likely to better discriminate between higher and lower individual health need in Hackney. We discuss the potential for this measure to:1: Collect individual level socio-economic data to better inform the commissioning of health and care services, alongside IMD 2: Provide opportunities for GP practices to signpost patients to financial advice23: Improve clinical decision support, for example through strengthening the algorithms in QRISK, while avoiding some of the sensitivities associated with recording of detailed income3References: 1. Brcic et al (2011) Development of a tool to identify poverty in a family practice setting. IJFM 2. Egan and Robison (2019) Integrating money advice workers into primary care settings. GCPH 3. MacPherson and Moscrop (2014) Should doctors record their patients income? BJGP External funding details
Abstract In urban populations, and particularly in London, people from extremes of wealth and poverty can live in close proximity. A simple individual test of self-reported socio-economic deprivation ('Do you ever have difficulty making ends meet at the end of the month?'), which was developed and validated in a Canadian primary care setting1, was tested in a survey of 1,000 adults resident in Hackney, selected to be broadly representative of the population. We use this dataset to examine health inequalities using this individual level measure, and compare results with the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2015 (IMD, which applies to populations in areas of around 1,500 residents, and is a composite of 37 different statistics reflecting different aspects of deprivation in an area). We show that the simpler measure is likely to better discriminate between higher and lower individual health need in Hackney. We discuss the potential for this measure to:1: Collect individual level socio-economic data to better inform the commissioning of health and care services, alongside IMD 2: Provide opportunities for GP practices to signpost patients to financial advice23: Improve clinical decision support, for example through strengthening the algorithms in QRISK, while avoiding some of the sensitivities associated with recording of detailed income3References: 1. Brcic et al (2011) Development of a tool to identify poverty in a family practice setting. IJFM 2. Egan and Robison (2019) Integrating money advice workers into primary care settings. GCPH 3. MacPherson and Moscrop (2014) Should doctors record their patients income? BJGP External funding details
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