Significantly higher rates of chlamydia found in army personnel compared with non military patients
PHE ePoster Library. Iveson H. 09/12/19; 274457; 251
Helen Iveson
Helen Iveson
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction
Our Sexual Health service covers a county-wide population, including large numbers of Army personnel. Despite military personnel being recognised as high risk for sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), accurate data on STI and HIV epidemiology within the military is lacking. We introduced a local code (“ARMY”) from April 2016. This has enabled us to monitor numbers of Army attendees and compare STI rates and risk factors with non-military patients.
Methods
Local “ARMY” code added by clinicians at time of consultation, based on information including: patient self-reported occupation, garrison address, military uniform. Electronic patient records for all male new or rebook attendees between 15/4/16 and 2/3/17 with an “ARMY” code were reviewed (n = 376). These were compared with a non-military group of male patients (n=376) attending during same time period and were matched for age group, sexuality and presence/absence of symptoms.
Results
Male army personnel were found to have significantly higher levels of chlamydia positivity (64/376, 17.0%) compared to male non-military attendees (37/376, 9.8%) (p= 0.0052, Fisher's exact 2-tail). This higher rate of chlamydia was found despite comparable numbers of: sexual partners in prior three months, presentations as chlamydia contacts and high-risk alcohol users. Rates of gonorrhoea, warts, HSV, HIV and syphilis did not differ significantly. Army personnel were significantly more likely to be of non -white British ethnicity than local resident population (10.1% vs 3.5 %, p =0.0004, Fisher's exact 2-tail).
Conclusion
Our findings support promotion of sexual health screening for military personnel and targeting of chlamydia testing. External funding details
Abstract Introduction
Our Sexual Health service covers a county-wide population, including large numbers of Army personnel. Despite military personnel being recognised as high risk for sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), accurate data on STI and HIV epidemiology within the military is lacking. We introduced a local code (“ARMY”) from April 2016. This has enabled us to monitor numbers of Army attendees and compare STI rates and risk factors with non-military patients.
Methods
Local “ARMY” code added by clinicians at time of consultation, based on information including: patient self-reported occupation, garrison address, military uniform. Electronic patient records for all male new or rebook attendees between 15/4/16 and 2/3/17 with an “ARMY” code were reviewed (n = 376). These were compared with a non-military group of male patients (n=376) attending during same time period and were matched for age group, sexuality and presence/absence of symptoms.
Results
Male army personnel were found to have significantly higher levels of chlamydia positivity (64/376, 17.0%) compared to male non-military attendees (37/376, 9.8%) (p= 0.0052, Fisher's exact 2-tail). This higher rate of chlamydia was found despite comparable numbers of: sexual partners in prior three months, presentations as chlamydia contacts and high-risk alcohol users. Rates of gonorrhoea, warts, HSV, HIV and syphilis did not differ significantly. Army personnel were significantly more likely to be of non -white British ethnicity than local resident population (10.1% vs 3.5 %, p =0.0004, Fisher's exact 2-tail).
Conclusion
Our findings support promotion of sexual health screening for military personnel and targeting of chlamydia testing. External funding details
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