Applying modified-DPSEEA model to frame e-cigarette use as an intervention in tobacco-smoking cessation - an environmental public health perspective
PHE ePoster Library. Owodunni T. 09/12/19; 274422; 220
Tayo Owodunni
Tayo Owodunni
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract External funding details BackgroundElectronic (‘e')-cigarettes have fast become the most popular quitting-aid among tobacco smokers. Current toxicological evidence indicates: “E-cigarettes are expected to be 95% less-harmful than conventional cigarette smoking but not 100% safe” (http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1447624/1/Brown_West%202014%20E-cigarettes%20APPG%20briefing.pdf). Perception remains that e-cigarette use produces unintended public health consequences, offering “gateways” to uptake among non-smokers. Thus, contextualising various complex “cause-and-effect” relationships between e-cigarette policy-drivers vis-à-vis environmental health impacts is important.AimWe sought to test the usability of the modified-DPSEEA (driving-forces, pressures, states, exposures, effects and actions) conceptual-mapping framework, incorporating contextual issues related to e-cigarette intervention for smoking-cessation.
Methods
In June 2017, 22 environmental public health subject-matter-experts and tobacco-control topic leads participated in a workshop using m-DPSEEA approach to investigate e-cigarette impacts including smoking habits, health effects and benefits, environmental pollution, toxicology, public health implications and policy needs.
Results
Deploying m-DPSEEA methodology produced conceptual-maps elucidating chain-relationships of complex parameters, including: normalisation of smoking habits; impact on tobacco-based economies; obesogenic reactions; respiratory and maternal health concerns; toxicant exposure; health risks from a rapidly innovative industry introducing additives/alternatives; knowledge gaps and policy advice. Subsequently, m-DPSEEA was redeployed by the national Tobacco-Control Implementation Board to frame risks from tobacco industry's marketing of “heat-not-burn” tobacco-based alternatives.
Conclusion
sm-DPSEEA is viable for framing complex public health issues. It presents panoramic approaches for detecting knowledge gaps, supports intervention strategies and diffuses complexity to non-specialist audiences, while retaining acceptable, logical rigor. However, care is required to avoid m-DPSEEA oversimplifying complex influences in real-world scenarios. Its use could benefit from quality standards for generalisability.
Abstract External funding details BackgroundElectronic (‘e')-cigarettes have fast become the most popular quitting-aid among tobacco smokers. Current toxicological evidence indicates: “E-cigarettes are expected to be 95% less-harmful than conventional cigarette smoking but not 100% safe” (http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1447624/1/Brown_West%202014%20E-cigarettes%20APPG%20briefing.pdf). Perception remains that e-cigarette use produces unintended public health consequences, offering “gateways” to uptake among non-smokers. Thus, contextualising various complex “cause-and-effect” relationships between e-cigarette policy-drivers vis-à-vis environmental health impacts is important.AimWe sought to test the usability of the modified-DPSEEA (driving-forces, pressures, states, exposures, effects and actions) conceptual-mapping framework, incorporating contextual issues related to e-cigarette intervention for smoking-cessation.
Methods
In June 2017, 22 environmental public health subject-matter-experts and tobacco-control topic leads participated in a workshop using m-DPSEEA approach to investigate e-cigarette impacts including smoking habits, health effects and benefits, environmental pollution, toxicology, public health implications and policy needs.
Results
Deploying m-DPSEEA methodology produced conceptual-maps elucidating chain-relationships of complex parameters, including: normalisation of smoking habits; impact on tobacco-based economies; obesogenic reactions; respiratory and maternal health concerns; toxicant exposure; health risks from a rapidly innovative industry introducing additives/alternatives; knowledge gaps and policy advice. Subsequently, m-DPSEEA was redeployed by the national Tobacco-Control Implementation Board to frame risks from tobacco industry's marketing of “heat-not-burn” tobacco-based alternatives.
Conclusion
sm-DPSEEA is viable for framing complex public health issues. It presents panoramic approaches for detecting knowledge gaps, supports intervention strategies and diffuses complexity to non-specialist audiences, while retaining acceptable, logical rigor. However, care is required to avoid m-DPSEEA oversimplifying complex influences in real-world scenarios. Its use could benefit from quality standards for generalisability.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings