Creating school environments which support mental wellbeing – what matters to children and young people?
PHE ePoster Library. Beynon C. 09/12/19; 274362; 168
Mrs. Claire Beynon
Mrs. Claire Beynon
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Abstract
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Abstract BackgroundOne in ten children and young people have a clinically diagnosed mental health disorder and/or emotional and behaviour problems. For children and young people with poor mental health there is an increased likelihood of poor social and economic outcomes, in both the short and long term. The aim was to better understand what is important to children's mental well-being in a school setting.
Methods
A review of literature was undertaken to ascertain if the whole school approach to mental well-being was still appropriate and then six focus groups were held with a total of 62 pupils (5-18 years) to discuss what matters to children to support their mental well-being.
Results
A thematic review of all of the qualitative data from the focus groups was undertaken. Fourteen themes emerged. Some are presented below.ThemesFostering good working relationships: “There needs to be more emphasis on rapport between pupils and teachers.”Having a strong pupil voice: “It makes me feel sad when people are not listening to your opinion.”Prioritising staff well-being: “You feel happy when they [staff] are happy, when they are in a bad mood the work feels harder.”Monitoring staff turnover: “How can teachers inspire us when they are stressed?”Celebrating diversity: “It makes me feel sad when people say unkind things to me because I am different.”ConclusionThe themes identified by the children were used as a basis for the new ‘Wales Healthy School Scheme' criteria. External funding details
Abstract BackgroundOne in ten children and young people have a clinically diagnosed mental health disorder and/or emotional and behaviour problems. For children and young people with poor mental health there is an increased likelihood of poor social and economic outcomes, in both the short and long term. The aim was to better understand what is important to children's mental well-being in a school setting.
Methods
A review of literature was undertaken to ascertain if the whole school approach to mental well-being was still appropriate and then six focus groups were held with a total of 62 pupils (5-18 years) to discuss what matters to children to support their mental well-being.
Results
A thematic review of all of the qualitative data from the focus groups was undertaken. Fourteen themes emerged. Some are presented below.ThemesFostering good working relationships: “There needs to be more emphasis on rapport between pupils and teachers.”Having a strong pupil voice: “It makes me feel sad when people are not listening to your opinion.”Prioritising staff well-being: “You feel happy when they [staff] are happy, when they are in a bad mood the work feels harder.”Monitoring staff turnover: “How can teachers inspire us when they are stressed?”Celebrating diversity: “It makes me feel sad when people say unkind things to me because I am different.”ConclusionThe themes identified by the children were used as a basis for the new ‘Wales Healthy School Scheme' criteria. External funding details
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