The secondary care burden of influenza disease in England, 2018/2019
PHE ePoster Library. Davidson C. 09/12/19; 274290; 102
Mr. Craig Davidson
Mr. Craig Davidson
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction
Seasonal influenza disease epidemics are a known contributor to winter pressures in the UK with some severe cases resulting in hospitalisation from complications. In 2017/18, it was estimated that influenza was associated with 15,969 excess deaths along with most of the 2,095 acute respiratory illness outbreaks reported to PHE.1 We sought to analyse Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data to describe the direct secondary care burden of diagnosed influenza cases in England throughout the season.
Methods
Using HES data from October 2017 to March 2018 (influenza season); all non-elective hospital admissions, patient counts, bed days, tariff costs, and deaths with primary or secondary diagnosis ICD-10 codes related to influenza (J09-11) were extracted. Admissions and patient numbers were rounded up to the nearest 5 in accordance with NHS Digital guidelines. From these data we calculated national mean length of stay (LOS), cost per admission, and death rate across the population.
Results
In the 2017/18 season, 46,015 influenza admissions were recorded for 41,550 patients. This resulted in 400,008 bed days and total hospital costs of £127,649,171. The mean LOS was 8.7 days and mean admission cost was £3,072. When considering total influenza-related admissions, 6.84% were associated with death in hospital.
Conclusion
Influenza can have a substantial, negative impact on the healthcare system even before considering primary care burden and a broader societal burden. Prioritising prevention of disease through vaccination programmes could result in considerable savings for the healthcare system and alleviate temporal pressure on hospital resources. External funding details Conducted and funded by Sanofi Pasteur
Abstract Introduction
Seasonal influenza disease epidemics are a known contributor to winter pressures in the UK with some severe cases resulting in hospitalisation from complications. In 2017/18, it was estimated that influenza was associated with 15,969 excess deaths along with most of the 2,095 acute respiratory illness outbreaks reported to PHE.1 We sought to analyse Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) data to describe the direct secondary care burden of diagnosed influenza cases in England throughout the season.
Methods
Using HES data from October 2017 to March 2018 (influenza season); all non-elective hospital admissions, patient counts, bed days, tariff costs, and deaths with primary or secondary diagnosis ICD-10 codes related to influenza (J09-11) were extracted. Admissions and patient numbers were rounded up to the nearest 5 in accordance with NHS Digital guidelines. From these data we calculated national mean length of stay (LOS), cost per admission, and death rate across the population.
Results
In the 2017/18 season, 46,015 influenza admissions were recorded for 41,550 patients. This resulted in 400,008 bed days and total hospital costs of £127,649,171. The mean LOS was 8.7 days and mean admission cost was £3,072. When considering total influenza-related admissions, 6.84% were associated with death in hospital.
Conclusion
Influenza can have a substantial, negative impact on the healthcare system even before considering primary care burden and a broader societal burden. Prioritising prevention of disease through vaccination programmes could result in considerable savings for the healthcare system and alleviate temporal pressure on hospital resources. External funding details Conducted and funded by Sanofi Pasteur
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