Monitoring the impact of the Health and Safety Sharps Regulations: creation of an interactive tool to assess the uptake of safer sharps in Scotland, 2013-2017
PHE ePoster Library. Ruiz-de-Azua Unzurrunzaga G. Apr 10, 2019; 257518
Garazi Ruiz-de-Azua Unzurrunzaga
Garazi Ruiz-de-Azua Unzurrunzaga
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Abstract
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Abstract Aim: Since the introduction of the Health and Safety (Sharp Instruments in Healthcare) Regulations in 2013, employers who deliver healthcare are obliged to use safer sharps devices (where practicable). The uptake of safer sharps devices across Scotland can be established using NHS National Procurement (NP) purchasing data. We describe the development of an interactive tool ('dashboard') to monitor uptake, and an analysis of data from 2013 to 2017.
Methods:
: The dashboard (developed by NP in collaboration with HPS) is populated with data on sharps and non-sharp alternatives (NSA) devices that have been distributed via the National Distribution Centre. Devices are labelled as safety, non-safety or NSA, and categorised into 11 'product families' by a Commodity Specialist. These data are uploaded to a Tableau dashboard accessible via the Procurement Commissioning and Facilities Management Information Portal.
Results:
: The proportion of safety devices being purchased by NHS Boards in Scotland rose from 37% in 2013 to 79% in 2017 (p-value<0.01). Sales of NSAs have also increased over this time period (p-value<0.01). Uptake of safety devices varied across the Boards, ranging from 99% to 20%. In 2017, 89.53%, 95.19% and 99.83% of blood collection needles, IV cannula and lancets, respectively, were safer sharps. The percentage of safety hypodermic needles increased from 3.17% in 2013 to 77.30% in 2017. Not all product families have shown an increase over time with the uptake of safety butterfly needles dropping from 67.54% in 2013 to 58.78% in 2017.Conclusion: Uptake of safety devices and NSAs has increased significantly across Scotland since 2013. The interactive dashboard can be used to monitor uptake, and can be interrogated locally to identify which type of sharps devices are being ordered. Coupled with local knowledge on risk assessments, this can highlight areas that may require interventions to improve compliance with the regulations. Funding The project received a three year funding from the Scottish Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections (SARHAI) group.Scottish Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections (SARHAI)Roy K National Sharps Injury Prevention Programme (Phase 1) April 2015 – March 2016 Scottish Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections (SARHAI)Roy K National Sharps Injury Prevention Programme (Phase 2) April 2016 – March 2017 Scottish Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections (SARHAI) Roy K National Sharps Injury Prevention Programme (Phase 3) April 2017 – March 2018
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