Audit of the AUDIT-C: analysing the utilisation of an alcohol screening tool
PHE ePoster Library. Parker S. 09/10/18; 221408; 17
Stacey Parker
Stacey Parker
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction: Alcohol misuse is associated with a number of issues, including several long term physical health conditions, worsening mental health, as well as increased pressure and cost to NHS services. One way by which this can be addressed is through the early identification of patients at risk of alcohol misuse, through the use of screening tools such as the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT C). However, for the AUDIT C to function as an effective screening measure, it must be scored regularly and correctly by clinicians. This poster looks to evaluate the use of the AUDIT C in a North West London hospital, with a focus on exploring both completion rates and whether the audit scores are congruent with those of the alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologists. Methods: An audit was carried out weekly over a four-month period, exploring the percentage of AUDIT C completed across seven hospital wards. A between groups comparison was also used to compare scores given by alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologist and ward staff on the Audit C. Results: Audit completion rate varied from ward to ward, with several wards with low completion rates. The results also highlighted a significant discrepancy between scoring by ward staff and by alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologists. Clinical implications: Appropriate use of the AUDIT C provides an invaluable opportunity for staff to identify and support clients at risk due to their alcohol use. Considerations on how to utilise this tool in the hospital to effectively tackle alcohol-related admissions are discussed.
Abstract Introduction: Alcohol misuse is associated with a number of issues, including several long term physical health conditions, worsening mental health, as well as increased pressure and cost to NHS services. One way by which this can be addressed is through the early identification of patients at risk of alcohol misuse, through the use of screening tools such as the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT C). However, for the AUDIT C to function as an effective screening measure, it must be scored regularly and correctly by clinicians. This poster looks to evaluate the use of the AUDIT C in a North West London hospital, with a focus on exploring both completion rates and whether the audit scores are congruent with those of the alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologists. Methods: An audit was carried out weekly over a four-month period, exploring the percentage of AUDIT C completed across seven hospital wards. A between groups comparison was also used to compare scores given by alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologist and ward staff on the Audit C. Results: Audit completion rate varied from ward to ward, with several wards with low completion rates. The results also highlighted a significant discrepancy between scoring by ward staff and by alcohol-specialist Assistant Psychologists. Clinical implications: Appropriate use of the AUDIT C provides an invaluable opportunity for staff to identify and support clients at risk due to their alcohol use. Considerations on how to utilise this tool in the hospital to effectively tackle alcohol-related admissions are discussed.
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