Daily syndromic surveillance support during the 2017/18 influenza season
PHE ePoster Library. Elliot A. 09/10/18; 221353; 162
Dr. Alex Elliot
Dr. Alex Elliot
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Abstract
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Abstract The winter of 2017/18 saw significant UK influenza circulation with activity in primary care recorded at levels not seen since 2010/11. Influenza circulation in the community started in week 50 with evidence from a range of surveillance indicators triggering the release of the CMO antiviral prescribing alert. Following the Christmas holidays, influenza activity indicators continued to increase, concurrent with reported increases in pressures across the NHS.In response to a request from the Office of the Secretary of State for Health, PHE were asked to deliver a daily situational report to provide updates on the evolving influenza activity. In close collaboration with the Medical Directors Office and the Respiratory Diseases Department, the Real-time Syndromic Surveillance Team produced a daily report containing two metrics of influenza activity: daily GP consultations for influenza-like illness and daily ED attendances for acute respiratory infection. GP rates were used as a real-time measure of the primary care burden, and ED attendances for secondary care. From 8 January to 15 March, 49 daily situational reports were delivered during weekdays, complementing the weekly PHE flu surveillance and virological indicators in primary and secondary care. However, the request for daily data presented problems with interpretation and delivering key public health messages to ministers. Here, we describe the 2017/18 influenza season as recorded through daily syndromic surveillance systems comparing it to other influenza surveillance metrics and also discuss some of the key issues and problems around the use of daily data for surveillance during public health incidents. External funding details N/A
Abstract The winter of 2017/18 saw significant UK influenza circulation with activity in primary care recorded at levels not seen since 2010/11. Influenza circulation in the community started in week 50 with evidence from a range of surveillance indicators triggering the release of the CMO antiviral prescribing alert. Following the Christmas holidays, influenza activity indicators continued to increase, concurrent with reported increases in pressures across the NHS.In response to a request from the Office of the Secretary of State for Health, PHE were asked to deliver a daily situational report to provide updates on the evolving influenza activity. In close collaboration with the Medical Directors Office and the Respiratory Diseases Department, the Real-time Syndromic Surveillance Team produced a daily report containing two metrics of influenza activity: daily GP consultations for influenza-like illness and daily ED attendances for acute respiratory infection. GP rates were used as a real-time measure of the primary care burden, and ED attendances for secondary care. From 8 January to 15 March, 49 daily situational reports were delivered during weekdays, complementing the weekly PHE flu surveillance and virological indicators in primary and secondary care. However, the request for daily data presented problems with interpretation and delivering key public health messages to ministers. Here, we describe the 2017/18 influenza season as recorded through daily syndromic surveillance systems comparing it to other influenza surveillance metrics and also discuss some of the key issues and problems around the use of daily data for surveillance during public health incidents. External funding details N/A
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