A systematic review of weight management interventions for young people with special educational needs and disabilities
PHE ePoster Library. Farman R. 09/10/18; 221304; 132
Ms. Rachel Farman
Ms. Rachel Farman
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction: Young people with special educational needs and (learning, sensory and physical) disabilities (SEND) are at an increased risk of being obese. However, there remains a limited evidence-base underpinning the management of obesity in this population. Understanding current practice will help develop future public health interventions. Methods: The research protocol for this review was submitted on the PROSPERO database. Studies were obtained by searching six databases: CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE; PsycINFO, PubMed, Science Direct; Web of Science. Included studies examined overweight/obese participants, aged ≥5 - ≤18 years with SEND, in attendance of a weight management intervention. Two reviewers independently assessed full texts and quality assessment. Reasons for exclusion were recorded and differences of opinion were resolved by a third reviewer.Results:619 records were obtained through searches and 38 full texts were screened. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies were predominately multi-component interventions, with a combination of health education, dietary, physical activity and behaviour change techniques. Intervention length varied from 8 weeks to 12 months and attrition rates ranged from 5% to 61%. Participants in all studies demonstrated reductions in body weight (kg) or improvements in body composition from pre to post-intervention. Evidence was of weak (50%) and moderate (50%) quality.Conclusions:The results are encouraging and indicate that appropriately tailored interventions can potentially support young people with SEND. However, the studies generally had a small sample size, varied delivery, and lower quality methodology so must be interpreted with great caution. More high quality research is essential in this area.
Abstract Introduction: Young people with special educational needs and (learning, sensory and physical) disabilities (SEND) are at an increased risk of being obese. However, there remains a limited evidence-base underpinning the management of obesity in this population. Understanding current practice will help develop future public health interventions. Methods: The research protocol for this review was submitted on the PROSPERO database. Studies were obtained by searching six databases: CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE; PsycINFO, PubMed, Science Direct; Web of Science. Included studies examined overweight/obese participants, aged ≥5 - ≤18 years with SEND, in attendance of a weight management intervention. Two reviewers independently assessed full texts and quality assessment. Reasons for exclusion were recorded and differences of opinion were resolved by a third reviewer.Results:619 records were obtained through searches and 38 full texts were screened. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. The studies were predominately multi-component interventions, with a combination of health education, dietary, physical activity and behaviour change techniques. Intervention length varied from 8 weeks to 12 months and attrition rates ranged from 5% to 61%. Participants in all studies demonstrated reductions in body weight (kg) or improvements in body composition from pre to post-intervention. Evidence was of weak (50%) and moderate (50%) quality.Conclusions:The results are encouraging and indicate that appropriately tailored interventions can potentially support young people with SEND. However, the studies generally had a small sample size, varied delivery, and lower quality methodology so must be interpreted with great caution. More high quality research is essential in this area.
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