Bovine tuberculosis in hunting hounds: an issue of increasing public health concern
Author(s): ,
Emily Phipps
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Kate McPhedran
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
David Edwards
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Richard Dampney
Affiliations:
APHA
,
Tony Roberts
Affiliations:
APHA
,
Amanda Walsh
Affiliations:
PHE
,
Katherine Russell
Affiliations:
PHE
Jill Morris
Affiliations:
PHE
PHE ePoster Library. Morris J. Mar 20, 2018; 209127; 12982
Jill Morris
Jill Morris
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Abstract
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Abstract BACKGROUND: Public Health England South East have recently been involved in the management of an outbreak of bovine TB in a pack of hunting hounds. This poster summarises the actions taken by the team in managing this situation, and lessons that can be learned to improve the management of future potential outbreaks. METHODS: A literature search was conducted to identify relevant publications on bovine TB in hunting hounds. Clinical notes from the health protection database HPZone were reviewed and key points extracted. Stakeholders involved in the management of the situation provided further evidence through unstructured interviews and personal communications. RESULTS: The PHE South East team initially provided ‘inform and advise’ letters to human contacts whilst awaiting laboratory confirmation. Once bovine TB had been confirmed in the hounds, an in-depth risk assessment was conducted, and contacts were stratified in to risk pools. A ‘stone in the pond’ approach was adopted for screening, with those at highest risk of exposure screened initially. One asymptomatic exposed person required further investigations with the TB services but all those screened tested negative. CONCLUSION: The number of human contacts with hunting packs can be large and varied. Health protection teams should undertake a comprehensive risk assessment of all potential routes of exposure, involve all other relevant stakeholders from an early stage, and undertake regular risk assessments. Further research is required to better understand the risks to human health from exposure to bovine TB and other potentially zoonotic infections in hunting hounds in order to develop more appropriate guidance. Funding N/A
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