Predicting the future health and economic impact of outdoor air pollutants
Author(s): ,
Lise Retat
Affiliations:
UK Health Forum
,
Laura Webber
Affiliations:
UKHF
,
Laura Pimpin
Affiliations:
UKHF
,
Daniela Fecht
Affiliations:
Imperial College London
,
Laure de Preux
Affiliations:
Imperial College Business School London
,
John Murray
Affiliations:
UKHF
,
John Gulliver
Affiliations:
Imperial College London
,
Franco Sassi
Affiliations:
Imperial College Business School London
,
Annalisa Belloni
Affiliations:
PHE
Abbygail Jaccard
Affiliations:
UKHF
PHE ePoster Library. Retat L. Mar 21, 2018; 205901; 12537
Lise Retat
Lise Retat
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Abstract
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Abstract Background: Air pollution has a significant impact upon public health, increasing the risk of conditions such as asthma, cardiovascular, and respiratory disease, as well as risk of death, having a considerable impact upon local and national health budgets. This project produced a tool, that enables local authorities to estimate the future health and cost burden of air pollution related diseases in their region. Method: A deterministic outdoor air pollution tool commissioned by PHE was developed by the UKHF and Imperial College London to quantify the potential future costs to the National Health Service (NHS) and social care due to the health impacts of pollutants Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) and Particulate Matter 2.5 (PM2.5) in England and each local authority. The following costs were considered: primary care, secondary care, medication and social care. The tool predicts the impact attributable to air pollution and has the functionality to test different general ‘what if' scenarios for the reduction of air pollution, such as a given reduction in exposure to air pollution on the future impact on health and related cost. Results: A variety of results from the tool will be showcased with a focus on Lambeth (area of high exposure), South Lakeland (area of relatively low exposure), and England. Extensive user testing has highlighted improvements required to the tool which have been implemented to ensure it is user friendly. Conclusion: The tool will be downloadable from the PHE website. It provides a useful way of quantifying the future burden of air pollution related disease and subsequent health costs, which is necessary for resource planning and leveraging change in relation to investment in interventions to reduce and/or prevent air pollution. Funding PHE: Health Economics Framework
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