Delineation of Surface Domains on HPV16 Recognised by Antibodies Elicited by Vaccination or Natural Infection
Author(s): ,
Stuti Vaghadia
Affiliations:
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London, UK
,
Anna Godi
Affiliations:
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London, UK
,
Sara Bissett
Affiliations:
The Francis Crick Institute, London
,
Clementina Cocuzza
Affiliations:
Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milan-Bicocca, Monza, Italy
,
Elizabeth Miller
Affiliations:
National Vaccine Evaluation Consortium, Public Health England, London, UK
Simon Beddows
Affiliations:
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London, UK
PHE ePoster Library. Vaghadia S. Mar 20, 2018; 205899; 12528
Stuti Vaghadia
Stuti Vaghadia
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Introduction: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical and other cancers and accounts for ca. 5% of the global cancer burden. HPV16 is the most prevalent genotype and HPV vaccines (Cervarix® and Gardasil®) demonstrate excellent efficacy in clinical trials and effectiveness in national immunization programmes against this genotype. It is unclear whether the greater protection they confer, compared to natural infection antibodies, is due to differences in antibody magnitude and/or specificity. Objective: To identify neutralizing antigenic domains within the surface-exposed loops of the major capsid protein recognized by vaccine and natural infection antibodies. Methods: Chimeric pseudoviruses incorporating loop (BC, DE, EF, FG and HI) swaps between the target (HPV16) and background control (HPV35) antigens were generated, purified by ultracentrifugation and characterised by SDS PAGE, electron microscopy, neutralization assays and modelling of the HPV16 and HPV35 L1 capsomer crystals.Results: Vaccine antibodies consistently exhibited an FG loop preference followed by the EF and HI loops, but demonstrated a clear requirement for multiple loops. Natural infection antibodies displayed a more diverse recognition pattern, most frequently against the EF loop followed by BC and FG. Crystal modelling identified clusters of residues at the apex of the EF, FG and HI loops as potential antigenic domains. Characterization of additional chimeras with multiple loop swaps is ongoing. Conclusion: Chimeric pseudoviruses may be useful tools to differentiate between vaccine and natural infection antibodies. These data will improve the evidence base for the effectiveness of an important public health intervention. Funding Funding information: Serum samples were available from a study that was funded in part by the United Kingdom Department of Health Policy Research Programme. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily of the United Kingdom Department of Health. SV was a joint PHE/QMUL MSc student.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings