Qualitative impact assessment of an educational workshop on primary care practitioner attitudes to NICE HIV testing guidelines
Author(s): ,
Rosalie Allison
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Ellie J. Ricketts
Affiliations:
Derriford Hospital
,
Thomas Hartney
Affiliations:
University College London
,
Anthony Nardone
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Katy Town
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Claire Rugman
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Kate A. Folkard
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Kevin Dunbar
Affiliations:
Public Health England
Cliodna A.M. McNulty
Affiliations:
Public Health England
PHE ePoster Library. Allison R. 03/20/18; 205893; 12517
Rosalie Allison
Rosalie Allison
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract BackgroundNational Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) HIV guidelines encourage GP staff to routinely offer HIV testing. In 2013, Public Health England piloted the ‘3Cs (chlamydia, contraception, condoms) and HIV' educational intervention in 460 GP surgeries consisting of two workshops aimed to improve the ability and confidence of staff to offer 3Cs and HIV testing in line with national guidelines.AimTo qualitatively assess GP staff's attitudes to HIV testing in primary care.Design and SettingQualitative interviews with GP staff across England before and after the workshops.Method32 GP staff (15 before and 17 after workshops) participated in interviews exploring their views and current practice of HIV testing. Interview transcripts were thematically analysed and examined using the components of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Normalisation Process Theory as a framework.ResultsGPs reported that the educational HIV workshop resulted in increased knowledge of, and confidence to offer HIV tests based on indicator conditions but participants, overall, felt they needed additional HIV training around: clinical care pathways for offering tests, giving positive HIV results and current treatments and outcomes. Participants did not see a place for point-of-care testing in general practice.ConclusionThe research shows that an educational workshop covering the NICE HIV guidelines was welcomed by GP staff, and gave them increased awareness of when to offer an HIV test in the primary care setting. Implementation of national HIV guidelines will require multiple educational sessions, especially to implement testing guidelines for indicator conditions in areas of low HIV prevalence. Additional role play or discussions around scripts suggesting how to offer an HIV test may improve participants' confidence and facilitate increased testing. Healthcare assistants may need specific training to ensure that they are skilled in offering HIV testing within new patient checks.
Abstract BackgroundNational Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) HIV guidelines encourage GP staff to routinely offer HIV testing. In 2013, Public Health England piloted the ‘3Cs (chlamydia, contraception, condoms) and HIV' educational intervention in 460 GP surgeries consisting of two workshops aimed to improve the ability and confidence of staff to offer 3Cs and HIV testing in line with national guidelines.AimTo qualitatively assess GP staff's attitudes to HIV testing in primary care.Design and SettingQualitative interviews with GP staff across England before and after the workshops.Method32 GP staff (15 before and 17 after workshops) participated in interviews exploring their views and current practice of HIV testing. Interview transcripts were thematically analysed and examined using the components of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Normalisation Process Theory as a framework.ResultsGPs reported that the educational HIV workshop resulted in increased knowledge of, and confidence to offer HIV tests based on indicator conditions but participants, overall, felt they needed additional HIV training around: clinical care pathways for offering tests, giving positive HIV results and current treatments and outcomes. Participants did not see a place for point-of-care testing in general practice.ConclusionThe research shows that an educational workshop covering the NICE HIV guidelines was welcomed by GP staff, and gave them increased awareness of when to offer an HIV test in the primary care setting. Implementation of national HIV guidelines will require multiple educational sessions, especially to implement testing guidelines for indicator conditions in areas of low HIV prevalence. Additional role play or discussions around scripts suggesting how to offer an HIV test may improve participants' confidence and facilitate increased testing. Healthcare assistants may need specific training to ensure that they are skilled in offering HIV testing within new patient checks.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings