Integrated health and wellbeing services: are they working to reduce health inequalities?
Author(s): ,
Andrew Billett
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Sarit Carlebach
Affiliations:
Teesside University
,
Mandy Cheetham
Affiliations:
FUSE Post-doctoral Research Associate
,
Michelle Mancini
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Catherine Parker
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Professor Rosemary Rushmer
Affiliations:
Teesside University until July 2017
,
Claire Sullivan
Affiliations:
Public Health England
Shelina Visram
Affiliations:
Durham University
PHE ePoster Library. Billett A. Mar 21, 2018; 205885; 12498
Andrew Billett
Andrew Billett
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Abstract
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Abstract Aims:Many Local Authorities have introduced integrated health and wellbeing (IHW) services in efforts to deliver cost effective, preventive services using asset-based approaches. Commissioned by Public Health England, this translational research project aims to carry out a collaborative, cross-site evaluation of four North East IHW services to understand what is working, where, for whom and under what conditions. Methods: Researchers have examined performance frameworks and IHW services across four sites, and how they were developed. Monitoring data is analysed to see who is using the services, for what, and with what outcomes (by gender, age, ethnicity and level of deprivation). Services aim to address health inequalities, so a health equity audit approach is used - are services being accessed by those who need them or just the worried well. Semi-structured interviews with commissioners and providers, and focus groups with service users, are being undertaken to explore how different parts of IHW services work. Case studies in each site will be developed to explore what difference community-based approaches make, and for whom. The knowledge is co-created. The research team comprises practitioners, policy-makers and academics. Findings:Quantitative and qualitative data will be presented. We report rates of access to services, adjusted for need, measured as the proportion of the population estimated to undertake three or more of four unhealthy behaviours.Analysis of the qualitative data will highlight opportunities and challenges for commissioners and providers of IHW services and explore the impact of community-based approaches, delivered as part of IHW services. We reflect on the challenges of translating the vision of integrated services into reality at local level. ConclusionsThe research aims to identify key ingredients for effective commissioning and delivery of IHW services, explore how services address inequalities, and provide timely evidence to support local practice. Funding Commissioned and funded by Public Health England.
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