Understanding the characteristics of hepatitis B positive mothers attending antenatal care settings in London to inform public health action, 2008 to 2016
Author(s): ,
Nastassya Chandra
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Clare Sawyer
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Miranda Mindlin
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Simone Thorn Heathcock
Affiliations:
Public Health England
Charlotte Anderson
Affiliations:
Public Health England
PHE ePoster Library. Chandra N. 03/20/18; 205884; 12497
Nastassya Chandra
Nastassya Chandra
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction:The Infectious Disease in Pregnancy Screening programme aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B by testing pregnant women for this infection. To achieve this, women who test positive are managed in pregnancy and their infants are vaccinated and higher risk infants are given Immunoglobulin at birth. Chronic hepatitis B can lead to liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Enhanced Surveillance of Antenatal Hepatitis B (ESAHB) database has collected information on pregnant women testing positive for hepatitis B in London since 2008. We describe its findings in order to inform commissioners of the challenges to effective service delivery. MethodsESAHB data from 2008-2016 was analysed in Stata-13. Demographic factors including age, ethnicity, birth country, English competency and residence, were described including trends over time.Results9,779 women were reported to ESHAB from 2008-2016. 17% reported living in very deprived areas (defined by Index of multiple deprivation score, 2015). The most common countries of birth were Nigeria (12%), China (10%) and Ghana (10%); only 5% were UK born. Overall, black African was the most common ethnicity (46%) but decreased from 54% in 2008 to 38% in 2016. The proportion of white other ethnicity increased from 14% in 2008 to 32% in 2016. Each year, approximately 30% of women spoke limited English with 106 first languages identified. The most frequently reported non-English first languages changed from Chinese, Somali, Romanian in 2008, to Romanian, Chinese, Albanian and Portuguese in 2016. Conclusion London's hepatitis B positive pregnant women were commonly born in countries where the infection was endemic, had limited English, lived in deprived areas of London and spoke a broad and changing range of languages. Commissioners and providers of health services need to be aware of these factors to provide an effective service which reaches these women and their babies. Funding PHE
Abstract Introduction:The Infectious Disease in Pregnancy Screening programme aims to reduce mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B by testing pregnant women for this infection. To achieve this, women who test positive are managed in pregnancy and their infants are vaccinated and higher risk infants are given Immunoglobulin at birth. Chronic hepatitis B can lead to liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Enhanced Surveillance of Antenatal Hepatitis B (ESAHB) database has collected information on pregnant women testing positive for hepatitis B in London since 2008. We describe its findings in order to inform commissioners of the challenges to effective service delivery. MethodsESAHB data from 2008-2016 was analysed in Stata-13. Demographic factors including age, ethnicity, birth country, English competency and residence, were described including trends over time.Results9,779 women were reported to ESHAB from 2008-2016. 17% reported living in very deprived areas (defined by Index of multiple deprivation score, 2015). The most common countries of birth were Nigeria (12%), China (10%) and Ghana (10%); only 5% were UK born. Overall, black African was the most common ethnicity (46%) but decreased from 54% in 2008 to 38% in 2016. The proportion of white other ethnicity increased from 14% in 2008 to 32% in 2016. Each year, approximately 30% of women spoke limited English with 106 first languages identified. The most frequently reported non-English first languages changed from Chinese, Somali, Romanian in 2008, to Romanian, Chinese, Albanian and Portuguese in 2016. Conclusion London's hepatitis B positive pregnant women were commonly born in countries where the infection was endemic, had limited English, lived in deprived areas of London and spoke a broad and changing range of languages. Commissioners and providers of health services need to be aware of these factors to provide an effective service which reaches these women and their babies. Funding PHE
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