Public Health England's Tick Surveillance Scheme: assessing the risk of tick-borne disease to the UK
Author(s): ,
Benjamin Cull
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Maaike Pietzsch
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Kayleigh Hansford
Affiliations:
Public Health England
,
Emma Gillingham
Affiliations:
Public Health England
Jolyon Medlock
Affiliations:
Public Health England
PHE ePoster Library. Cull B. 03/20/18; 205861; 12402
Dr. Benjamin Cull
Dr. Benjamin Cull
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Abstract
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Abstract Public Health England's Tick Surveillance Scheme (TSS) is a passive surveillance system, collecting national data on ticks to support the assessment of tick-borne disease risk to public health in the UK. During 2010 - 2016, 4173 records were submitted, constituting over 14,000 ticks; 97% were endemic tick records (13,833 ticks from 11 species), with an additional 97 records of imported ticks (438 ticks from 17 species). Tick samples were submitted by veterinary professionals (46.8%), members of the public (38.3%), academic institutions (6.0%), wildlife groups (5.7%) and health professionals (3.1%). The most common hosts of endemic ticks were dogs (n=1593; 39.1% of all records), humans (n=835; 20.5%) and cats (n=569; 14%). Ixodes ricinus was the most frequently recorded endemic tick species (n=2413; 59.2% of all records), followed by I. hexagonus (n=1355; 33.2%), I. canisuga (n=132; 3.2%) and I. frontalis (n=56; 1.4%). Five species of ticks were collected from humans, of which 89.7% were I. ricinus. This species was recorded throughout the year, but with highest numbers during May - July, indicating increased risk of tick bites during this period. Eighty one percent of I. ricinus recorded from humans were nymphs, whereas in contrast, 93.4% of I. ricinus from companion animals were adults. TSS records of I. ricinus suggest that this species is widespread in the UK, particularly in the southern regions of England. Data generated by the TSS on the tick species and life stages biting humans, their seasonality, distribution, and bite site locations are vital for informing the timing and content of PHE's public health messaging on ticks and tick bite prevention. Additionally, these data inform government advisory groups on emerging infections and are used to develop rapid disease risk assessments as new tick-borne disease issues arise. Funding This describes surveillance work supported by Public Health England's core funding.
Abstract Public Health England's Tick Surveillance Scheme (TSS) is a passive surveillance system, collecting national data on ticks to support the assessment of tick-borne disease risk to public health in the UK. During 2010 - 2016, 4173 records were submitted, constituting over 14,000 ticks; 97% were endemic tick records (13,833 ticks from 11 species), with an additional 97 records of imported ticks (438 ticks from 17 species). Tick samples were submitted by veterinary professionals (46.8%), members of the public (38.3%), academic institutions (6.0%), wildlife groups (5.7%) and health professionals (3.1%). The most common hosts of endemic ticks were dogs (n=1593; 39.1% of all records), humans (n=835; 20.5%) and cats (n=569; 14%). Ixodes ricinus was the most frequently recorded endemic tick species (n=2413; 59.2% of all records), followed by I. hexagonus (n=1355; 33.2%), I. canisuga (n=132; 3.2%) and I. frontalis (n=56; 1.4%). Five species of ticks were collected from humans, of which 89.7% were I. ricinus. This species was recorded throughout the year, but with highest numbers during May - July, indicating increased risk of tick bites during this period. Eighty one percent of I. ricinus recorded from humans were nymphs, whereas in contrast, 93.4% of I. ricinus from companion animals were adults. TSS records of I. ricinus suggest that this species is widespread in the UK, particularly in the southern regions of England. Data generated by the TSS on the tick species and life stages biting humans, their seasonality, distribution, and bite site locations are vital for informing the timing and content of PHE's public health messaging on ticks and tick bite prevention. Additionally, these data inform government advisory groups on emerging infections and are used to develop rapid disease risk assessments as new tick-borne disease issues arise. Funding This describes surveillance work supported by Public Health England's core funding.
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