Development of a toolkit to assess and value the barrier effects of busy roads ('community severance')
PHE ePoster Library. Mindell J. 09/12/17; 186682; 127
Dr. Jennifer Mindell
Dr. Jennifer Mindell
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionHeavily motorised roads reduce the amenity value of streets as active social spaces and can interfere with individuals' ability to access the goods, services, and people needed for a healthy life. Interference with active living affects particularly children and older people. Despite this, there has been a lack of tools to identify, measure, and study 'community severance' caused by busy roads. MethodsWe developed a suite of tools to measure community severance; we validated the tools through triangulation of findings from different data sources. These were tested in four case studies in England. New tools include: participatory mapping - engaging local residents to provide qualitative data on the locality; a pen-and-paper Health and Neighbourhood Mobility Survey to collect data from a random sample of local residents;a community severance valuation tool, based on data from stated preference surveys;walkability models; andvideo surveys, to determine pedestrian and motorised traffic flows and pedestrian crossing behaviours.Spatial analysis using space syntax and street audits were also used. Results Analyses of results within each case study showed coherence between the findings from the different measurement tools applied individually and revealed interconnections between factors which contribute to severance.ConclusionsCoherence of qualitative & quantitative findings supports the validity of the tools. The toolkit is available online (www.ucl.ac.uk/street-mobility) and is being used by local communities, practitioners, and researchers. Valuations of the impacts of community severance on local communities will aid business cases for expenditure to reduce severance. External funding details This study was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), grant EP/K037323/1.
Abstract IntroductionHeavily motorised roads reduce the amenity value of streets as active social spaces and can interfere with individuals' ability to access the goods, services, and people needed for a healthy life. Interference with active living affects particularly children and older people. Despite this, there has been a lack of tools to identify, measure, and study 'community severance' caused by busy roads. MethodsWe developed a suite of tools to measure community severance; we validated the tools through triangulation of findings from different data sources. These were tested in four case studies in England. New tools include: participatory mapping - engaging local residents to provide qualitative data on the locality; a pen-and-paper Health and Neighbourhood Mobility Survey to collect data from a random sample of local residents;a community severance valuation tool, based on data from stated preference surveys;walkability models; andvideo surveys, to determine pedestrian and motorised traffic flows and pedestrian crossing behaviours.Spatial analysis using space syntax and street audits were also used. Results Analyses of results within each case study showed coherence between the findings from the different measurement tools applied individually and revealed interconnections between factors which contribute to severance.ConclusionsCoherence of qualitative & quantitative findings supports the validity of the tools. The toolkit is available online (www.ucl.ac.uk/street-mobility) and is being used by local communities, practitioners, and researchers. Valuations of the impacts of community severance on local communities will aid business cases for expenditure to reduce severance. External funding details This study was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), grant EP/K037323/1.
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