Stop Smoking Practitioners' views on and experiences of e-cigarettes
PHE ePoster Library. Hiscock R. 09/12/17; 186653; 72
Rosemary Hiscock
Rosemary Hiscock
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Abstract
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Abstract Introduction: Stop Smoking Service (SSS) practitioners who provide behavioural support to smokers wishing to quit see nearly 400 000 smokers a year and are well-placed to understand key issues facing smokers, such as e-cigarettes. Thus, we have undertaken four online surveys of SSS practitioners opinions of e-cigarettes since 2011.Aims: This study aims to update findings of previous surveys and examine socioeconomic status differences via practitioner experiencesMethods: Responses to an online web survey in the field in September 2016 on practitioner experiences of e-cigarettes were analysed (n=514). Analysis was also undertaken of 2015/16 SSS client routine monitoring data.Results: SSS practitioners who answered the survey were becoming more positive about e-cigarettes: 42% agreed that e-cigarettes were a good thing compared with 15% in 2011. Nevertheless reported use of e-cigarettes among SSS clients was low (about 3%) despite high quit rates (63% of clients who used e-cigarettes as part of their quit attempt reported being quit at four weeks, compared with 51% overall.) Over half of practitioners did not identify socioeconomic differences in e-cigarette use. However, some practitioners commented that long term vaping might be more common among low SES groups and short term use of e-cigarettes to successfully quit might be more common among high SES groups.Conclusions: E-cigarette use is not common among SSS clients. Education of SSS staff is needed if they are to adopt current service recommendations about e-cigarettes. External funding details This study was funded by Cancer Research UK Tobacco Advisory Group award C50175/A21557.
Abstract Introduction: Stop Smoking Service (SSS) practitioners who provide behavioural support to smokers wishing to quit see nearly 400 000 smokers a year and are well-placed to understand key issues facing smokers, such as e-cigarettes. Thus, we have undertaken four online surveys of SSS practitioners opinions of e-cigarettes since 2011.Aims: This study aims to update findings of previous surveys and examine socioeconomic status differences via practitioner experiencesMethods: Responses to an online web survey in the field in September 2016 on practitioner experiences of e-cigarettes were analysed (n=514). Analysis was also undertaken of 2015/16 SSS client routine monitoring data.Results: SSS practitioners who answered the survey were becoming more positive about e-cigarettes: 42% agreed that e-cigarettes were a good thing compared with 15% in 2011. Nevertheless reported use of e-cigarettes among SSS clients was low (about 3%) despite high quit rates (63% of clients who used e-cigarettes as part of their quit attempt reported being quit at four weeks, compared with 51% overall.) Over half of practitioners did not identify socioeconomic differences in e-cigarette use. However, some practitioners commented that long term vaping might be more common among low SES groups and short term use of e-cigarettes to successfully quit might be more common among high SES groups.Conclusions: E-cigarette use is not common among SSS clients. Education of SSS staff is needed if they are to adopt current service recommendations about e-cigarettes. External funding details This study was funded by Cancer Research UK Tobacco Advisory Group award C50175/A21557.
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