Perceptions of HIV testing in 3 distinct settings among MSM
PHE ePoster Library. Jaspal R. 09/12/17; 186638; 39
Rusi Jaspal
Rusi Jaspal
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract HIV remains a pressing public health challenge in the UK. Although HIV prevalence and incidence are high among MSM, rates of HIV testing in this group remain low. Some do not perceive themselves to be at risk of HIV, while others prefer not to test due to fear of stigma. This study set out to understand a group of MSM's perceptions and experiences of testing for HIV in three distinct contexts: genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics, LGBT community settings and at home using a self-test kit. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 MSM, and the qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. The results indicate that interviewees generally perceived stigma due to their sexual minority identity in GUM clinics. Although they regarded LGBT community settings as more affirmative of their sexual minority identities, fears of homophobia and HIV prejudice could impede access to testing in these settings. There was a general concern about the loss of self-efficacy associated with HIV testing in GUM and community settings, which was restored by testing for HIV at home using a self-test kit. However, interviewees manifested concerns about the possibility of testing positive at home in the absence of social support. The results demonstrate the opposing concepts of risk and stigma in the narratives of MSM, and the overarching desire to maintain and protect a coherent sense of identity - principally as gay/ bisexual, HIV-negative men. Some practical recommendations for promoting HIV testing among MSM are provided.
Abstract HIV remains a pressing public health challenge in the UK. Although HIV prevalence and incidence are high among MSM, rates of HIV testing in this group remain low. Some do not perceive themselves to be at risk of HIV, while others prefer not to test due to fear of stigma. This study set out to understand a group of MSM's perceptions and experiences of testing for HIV in three distinct contexts: genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics, LGBT community settings and at home using a self-test kit. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 MSM, and the qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. The results indicate that interviewees generally perceived stigma due to their sexual minority identity in GUM clinics. Although they regarded LGBT community settings as more affirmative of their sexual minority identities, fears of homophobia and HIV prejudice could impede access to testing in these settings. There was a general concern about the loss of self-efficacy associated with HIV testing in GUM and community settings, which was restored by testing for HIV at home using a self-test kit. However, interviewees manifested concerns about the possibility of testing positive at home in the absence of social support. The results demonstrate the opposing concepts of risk and stigma in the narratives of MSM, and the overarching desire to maintain and protect a coherent sense of identity - principally as gay/ bisexual, HIV-negative men. Some practical recommendations for promoting HIV testing among MSM are provided.
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings