Impact of applying ethnic-specific body mass index adjustments on population overweight-obesity burdens in the National Child Measurement Programme
PHE ePoster Library. T Hudda M. 09/12/17; 186619; 170
Mohammed T Hudda
Mohammed T Hudda
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Abstract
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Abstract Background: There is little accurate information on body fatness (BF) in UK children of South Asian and Black ethnicity. National surveys, particularly the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP), are based on body mass index (BMI), which underestimates BF in South Asian children and overestimates BF in Black children. We developed adjusted BMI values, so the BMI-BF relation was equivalent across ethnic groups, to reassess the population burden in NCMP.Methods: We derived ethnic-specific adjusted BMI (aBMI) values using data from four UK population-based studies which made deuterium dilution BF assessments in 4-12y children of White, South Asian and Black ethnicity. aBMI values were derived for NCMP data (2012-2013) in 4-5y and 10-11y children and overweight-obesity prevalences were updated. Results: South Asian aBMI values were +1.1kg/m2 higher than BMI irrespective of sex, age and BF. aBMI values for Blacks required complex adjustments which varied by age and BF levels. At 4-5y, overweight-obesity prevalences (boys,girls) were 23%,21% in Whites. Adjusted prevalences higher in South Asians (39%,35%) but lower in Blacks (14%,15%) when compared to Whites. At 10-11y, prevalences were 33%,30% in Whites. Adjusted prevalences were, compared to Whites, markedly higher in South Asians (52%,44%) and slightly higher in Blacks (34%,37%). These patterns were different from BMI data, where Blacks had the highest burdens. Conclusion: BMI adjustment revealed substantial burdens of overweight-obesity in UK South Asian children and older Black girls which were not apparent using BMI. External funding details Funding: British Heart Foundation, NIHR-CLAHRC (South London and North Thames), Child Growth Foundation and Wellcome Trust.
Abstract Background: There is little accurate information on body fatness (BF) in UK children of South Asian and Black ethnicity. National surveys, particularly the National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP), are based on body mass index (BMI), which underestimates BF in South Asian children and overestimates BF in Black children. We developed adjusted BMI values, so the BMI-BF relation was equivalent across ethnic groups, to reassess the population burden in NCMP.Methods: We derived ethnic-specific adjusted BMI (aBMI) values using data from four UK population-based studies which made deuterium dilution BF assessments in 4-12y children of White, South Asian and Black ethnicity. aBMI values were derived for NCMP data (2012-2013) in 4-5y and 10-11y children and overweight-obesity prevalences were updated. Results: South Asian aBMI values were +1.1kg/m2 higher than BMI irrespective of sex, age and BF. aBMI values for Blacks required complex adjustments which varied by age and BF levels. At 4-5y, overweight-obesity prevalences (boys,girls) were 23%,21% in Whites. Adjusted prevalences higher in South Asians (39%,35%) but lower in Blacks (14%,15%) when compared to Whites. At 10-11y, prevalences were 33%,30% in Whites. Adjusted prevalences were, compared to Whites, markedly higher in South Asians (52%,44%) and slightly higher in Blacks (34%,37%). These patterns were different from BMI data, where Blacks had the highest burdens. Conclusion: BMI adjustment revealed substantial burdens of overweight-obesity in UK South Asian children and older Black girls which were not apparent using BMI. External funding details Funding: British Heart Foundation, NIHR-CLAHRC (South London and North Thames), Child Growth Foundation and Wellcome Trust.
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