Measuring socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England using the revised ONS definition, 2014-2015
PHE ePoster Library. Campbell A. 09/12/17; 186511; 160
Dr. Annie Campbell
Dr. Annie Campbell
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionAvoidable mortality is used as a high-level outcome indicator to monitor the impact of preventative interventions undertaken within the healthcare system as well as wider public health interventions. This work aims to investigate further the relationship between avoidable mortality and area-level deprivation using ONS's new definition introduced from 2014.MethodsThe 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation for England was used to measure the socioeconomic circumstances of populations, grouped into deciles of small areas. Death registrations covering the years 2014-2015 were used to calculate avoidable mortality rates and years of life lost for each sex, decile and year. The slope index of inequality in avoidable mortality was used to quantify gaps between deciles.ResultsStatistically significant inequalities were observed for both males and females on each metric. Avoidable mortality rates were three times higher for those who usually resided in the most deprived areas than those in the least deprived areas. Additionally, the extent of inequality was greater for males than females. The relationship between outcome and deprivation was sigmoidal, with the gaps between adjacent deciles largest at the extremes. ConclusionsThere is a clear relationship between deprivation and avoidable mortality. Those living in the most deprived areas are at greatest risk of dying from an avoidable cause, though further investigation is needed to understand the greater gaps found at the extremes. Future plans will extend analyses observing the trend between 2001 and 2013 to assess inequality in these measures in the context of policies introduced to tackle inequalities.
Abstract IntroductionAvoidable mortality is used as a high-level outcome indicator to monitor the impact of preventative interventions undertaken within the healthcare system as well as wider public health interventions. This work aims to investigate further the relationship between avoidable mortality and area-level deprivation using ONS's new definition introduced from 2014.MethodsThe 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation for England was used to measure the socioeconomic circumstances of populations, grouped into deciles of small areas. Death registrations covering the years 2014-2015 were used to calculate avoidable mortality rates and years of life lost for each sex, decile and year. The slope index of inequality in avoidable mortality was used to quantify gaps between deciles.ResultsStatistically significant inequalities were observed for both males and females on each metric. Avoidable mortality rates were three times higher for those who usually resided in the most deprived areas than those in the least deprived areas. Additionally, the extent of inequality was greater for males than females. The relationship between outcome and deprivation was sigmoidal, with the gaps between adjacent deciles largest at the extremes. ConclusionsThere is a clear relationship between deprivation and avoidable mortality. Those living in the most deprived areas are at greatest risk of dying from an avoidable cause, though further investigation is needed to understand the greater gaps found at the extremes. Future plans will extend analyses observing the trend between 2001 and 2013 to assess inequality in these measures in the context of policies introduced to tackle inequalities.
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