How perceptions of multi-agency response to flood events affect wellbeing
PHE ePoster Library. Quinn T. 09/13/17; 186510; 123
Dr. Tara Quinn
Dr. Tara Quinn
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Abstract
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Abstract The process of environmental risk management is shared between multiple agencies and the wider public, and how multi-agency response unfolds after a natural hazard event has implications for both agency employee wellbeing and for residents impacted on the ground. Using a case study of Somerset in South West England, which was badly affected by floods in 2013/14, this paper will consider how perceptions of institutional performance following the floods related to feelings of agency, trust in public authorities, and ultimately, wellbeing. We analysed responses both from agency workers, and from affected householders, to unpack their experience and interactions during the response period. We interviewed public agency workers (participant n=25) and affected residents (participant n=26) through a longitudinal series of semi-structured interviews in 2014 and repeated in 2015, alongside a household survey in the flooded area (n=500). Our findings suggest perceptions of multi-agency working impacts quality of life and wellbeing following flood events. It suggests a need for public health interventions to support wellbeing over the long-term, and the need to address wellbeing across multiple agencies beyond those explicitly concerned with health. We present potential opportunities for public agencies to engage in processes that can shape wellbeing outcomes, and that are likely to positively contribute to mental health after such disruptive events. External funding details This research was undertaken with funding from the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) and funding from the UK Economic and Social Research Council [Grant: ES/M006867/1]
Abstract The process of environmental risk management is shared between multiple agencies and the wider public, and how multi-agency response unfolds after a natural hazard event has implications for both agency employee wellbeing and for residents impacted on the ground. Using a case study of Somerset in South West England, which was badly affected by floods in 2013/14, this paper will consider how perceptions of institutional performance following the floods related to feelings of agency, trust in public authorities, and ultimately, wellbeing. We analysed responses both from agency workers, and from affected householders, to unpack their experience and interactions during the response period. We interviewed public agency workers (participant n=25) and affected residents (participant n=26) through a longitudinal series of semi-structured interviews in 2014 and repeated in 2015, alongside a household survey in the flooded area (n=500). Our findings suggest perceptions of multi-agency working impacts quality of life and wellbeing following flood events. It suggests a need for public health interventions to support wellbeing over the long-term, and the need to address wellbeing across multiple agencies beyond those explicitly concerned with health. We present potential opportunities for public agencies to engage in processes that can shape wellbeing outcomes, and that are likely to positively contribute to mental health after such disruptive events. External funding details This research was undertaken with funding from the National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) and funding from the UK Economic and Social Research Council [Grant: ES/M006867/1]
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