Lessons from East Riding needle exchange services (NES): Analysing use and demographics of heroin and image and performance enhancing drug (IPED) use to guide service provision
PHE ePoster Library. Margetts T. 09/12/17; 186499; 65
Tony Margetts
Tony Margetts
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionIPED injectors (largely anabolic steroids) now dominate new registrations at NES in the East Riding and nationally. Little is known about this emerging population. Data collected locally provides unique insights into the scale, demographics and distribution of people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the East Riding.Method This NES uses colour-coded pre-prepared packs specific to the injection substance and site. Registrations and transactions have been logged (using PharmOutcomes) since 2013. Registrations (n=635) and transactions (n=14,177) from 2015 and 2016 were analysed.ResultsOf PWID, 49% declared IPED and 43% declared heroin as their primary substance. Registrations per month were greater for IPED users (13.0) than heroin users (11.3) and increased more over two years (12.1 to 13.9 for IPED registrations; 11.0 to 11.7 for heroin).Deprivation indicators, geographic distribution and age of first injecting were similar for IPED and heroin injectors yet only 4 registrations declared dual heroin and IPED use.Delay to registration was 12.3 and 4.0 years for heroin and IPED injectors respectively.ConclusionIPED injectors form a discrete and growing sub-population of PWID: Whilst their age and geographic distribution reflect those of heroin users, their injecting behaviours differ. Deductions made from local data provide unique insights into the demographics of PWID in the East Riding which will guide evidence based changes to local services; including improved BBV testing, treatments services, health advice and reducing drug related deaths.With little national data available for comparison, it is possible that this level of insight may inform national trends.
Abstract IntroductionIPED injectors (largely anabolic steroids) now dominate new registrations at NES in the East Riding and nationally. Little is known about this emerging population. Data collected locally provides unique insights into the scale, demographics and distribution of people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the East Riding.Method This NES uses colour-coded pre-prepared packs specific to the injection substance and site. Registrations and transactions have been logged (using PharmOutcomes) since 2013. Registrations (n=635) and transactions (n=14,177) from 2015 and 2016 were analysed.ResultsOf PWID, 49% declared IPED and 43% declared heroin as their primary substance. Registrations per month were greater for IPED users (13.0) than heroin users (11.3) and increased more over two years (12.1 to 13.9 for IPED registrations; 11.0 to 11.7 for heroin).Deprivation indicators, geographic distribution and age of first injecting were similar for IPED and heroin injectors yet only 4 registrations declared dual heroin and IPED use.Delay to registration was 12.3 and 4.0 years for heroin and IPED injectors respectively.ConclusionIPED injectors form a discrete and growing sub-population of PWID: Whilst their age and geographic distribution reflect those of heroin users, their injecting behaviours differ. Deductions made from local data provide unique insights into the demographics of PWID in the East Riding which will guide evidence based changes to local services; including improved BBV testing, treatments services, health advice and reducing drug related deaths.With little national data available for comparison, it is possible that this level of insight may inform national trends.
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