The development of a UTI leaflet to improve antibiotic prescribing and increase self-care.
PHE ePoster Library. Jones L. 09/12/17; 186441; 56
Ms. Leah Jones
Ms. Leah Jones
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Abstract
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Abstract IntroductionUTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections seen in General Practice. UTIs precede about 50% of Escherichia coli bacteraemia, which are increasing. A public survey found 95% of women with UTI consulted a health professional, 74% reported being prescribed an antibiotic, yet only 63% reported taking them. Unnecessary antibiotics and E.coli bacteraemia could be reduced by improving syndromic based diagnosis and facilitating communication in consultations for urinary symptoms. AimTo develop a leaflet to optimise management of UTIs and reduce E.coli bacteraemia by facilitating dialogue between prescribers and women presenting with urinary symptoms.MethodFocus groups with 30 women and in-depth interviews with 20 GPs were conducted to explore how the consultation and discussions around diagnosis, antibiotic use, self-care, safety netting and prevention of UTI could be improved. Interview schedules were based on the theoretical domains framework. Results There were differences between GPs and women regarding patient knowledge of UTIs, the consultation process, patient expectation and patient awareness of AMR. Time, misunderstanding, lack of skills, nature of the consult and previous antibiotics were barriers to effective communication and optimal prescribing. ConclusionAn explanatory leaflet, with simple messaging, to share in the consultation would be a useful tool to improve patient management, and to explain the link between antibiotic use and resistance. GPs should be encouraged to explore their patient's knowledge, share information on self-care and prevention measures and antibiotic resistance when in a consultation. To facilitate this TARGET UTI leaflet was launched in 2016.
Abstract IntroductionUTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections seen in General Practice. UTIs precede about 50% of Escherichia coli bacteraemia, which are increasing. A public survey found 95% of women with UTI consulted a health professional, 74% reported being prescribed an antibiotic, yet only 63% reported taking them. Unnecessary antibiotics and E.coli bacteraemia could be reduced by improving syndromic based diagnosis and facilitating communication in consultations for urinary symptoms. AimTo develop a leaflet to optimise management of UTIs and reduce E.coli bacteraemia by facilitating dialogue between prescribers and women presenting with urinary symptoms.MethodFocus groups with 30 women and in-depth interviews with 20 GPs were conducted to explore how the consultation and discussions around diagnosis, antibiotic use, self-care, safety netting and prevention of UTI could be improved. Interview schedules were based on the theoretical domains framework. Results There were differences between GPs and women regarding patient knowledge of UTIs, the consultation process, patient expectation and patient awareness of AMR. Time, misunderstanding, lack of skills, nature of the consult and previous antibiotics were barriers to effective communication and optimal prescribing. ConclusionAn explanatory leaflet, with simple messaging, to share in the consultation would be a useful tool to improve patient management, and to explain the link between antibiotic use and resistance. GPs should be encouraged to explore their patient's knowledge, share information on self-care and prevention measures and antibiotic resistance when in a consultation. To facilitate this TARGET UTI leaflet was launched in 2016.
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